Tag Archives: summative assessment

Summative Results: Dealing with Expectations & Disappointment

Semester A, Summative results are due for release shortly. For some the stress & anxiety is coming to an end, whilst for others it is just beginning. 

dying-to-know

The stress and anxiety you feel leading up to results day has a lot to do with your own expectations, but also those of your family and / or account payer. There are a variety of options available to you in terms of dealing with your and other’s expectations, as well as with the disappoint of possibly not having done as well as you had hoped:

Dealing with assessment result pressure and expectations

Assessment result anxiety is a very real thing and can be experienced during the wait for results or even once you’ve received them. Feelings you may experience include:

  • happiness
  • jubilation
  • disappointment
  • depression
  • guilt
  • confusion
  • anger
  • illness
  • numbness

Expectations, both real and imagined, internal and external, need to be managed in order to minimize their harmful, demotivating effects and maximize their energizing, positive effects. Ways of dealing with pressure and expectations, in relation to assessment results, include:

  • Talking to someone who is not directly impacted by or involved in the situation, such as a friend or the BMH counsellor.
  • Talking to the person who is setting the expectations, and explaining that the added pressure is not helping.
  • Re-assessing your own expectations – are they realistic, are they attainable, are they helping or hindering you?
  • Writing down your feelings, drawing, singing, dancing – these are all cathartic ways of expressing and excising what you are feeling.
  • Avoid using alcohol and / or drugs as a coping mechanism, the problems and stress will still be there once you sober up.

It is also useful to take a step back and put things into perspective:

  • Poor assessment results are not the be-all and end-all of life as you may know it – unless you allow them to, they cannot stop you from achieving your long term goals.
  • Poor assessment results are not a reflection of your worth – they are a snapshot of a moment in time in your life.
  • Ask yourself “Will this matter in five years from now?” – if the answer is “yes” now is the ideal time to make a change and put a plan into action; if the answer is “no” then let it go.

will-it-matter

Your options going forward

Depending on your assessment results, you have a number of options going forward:

a) Apply for a Supplementary

Second chances are a wonderful thing BUT before you get too excited and rush off to collect a Supplementary Assessment Breif, read the fine print and make sure you meet the requirements for a supp:

  • Did you get 30% or more for your first summative assessment attempt?

OR

  • Were you legitimately ill or absent for the summative assessment and do you have a valid medical certificate to back this up?
  • The 2017 supplementary fee for summative assessments is R350.00

For more information on supplementary assessments please consult your 2017 BMH Student Rulebook or click here.

b) Submit an Appeal

You have the right to appeal an assessment outcome.  All summative assessments are returned to students for the purpose of advancing learning and verification of grades awarded (excluding exit-point, exit-level subject summative assessments). It is thus your responsibility to check your assessment and grade awarded and inform your Branch Manager if there are any discrepancies.

You have five (5) working days, from the day that results are published to submit an appeal for a specific assessment event. Appeals submitted after the 5 day window will not be taken under consideration.

For more information on the procedure to follow should you with to appeal an assessment result please consult your 2017 BMH Student Rulebook or click here.

c) Set Up a Student-Lecturer Meeting

If after you have received feedback on the summative assessment and you are still unclear of where you went wrong or lost marks, consider setting up a student-lecturer meeting. All BMH lecturers have consultation hours during which they are available to meet with students.

For tips on how to prepare for and get the most from a student-lecturer meeting click here.

d) Schedule a Session with BMHs Counsellor

Sometimes you just need someone to talk to and be there for you, which is why BMH offers free counselling to all its registered students. You may be dealing with problems (personal and / or academic) which are bothering you and preventing you from achieving your goals, or you may just need an objective person to share your concerns with. For more information on how to go about scheduling a session with BMH’s Counsellor please click here.


References: 

Reach Out.com (2015). Dealing with Exam Results. Retrieved from:  http://au.reachout.com/dealing-with-exam-results. [Accessed: 24 June 2016].

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How’s Your Brain Doing?

With the Summative Assessment period upon us you may be interested to know that your brain needs some TLC in order to help get you through the next few weeks.

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This may come as a shock to many but your brain plays a very important role in how productive and successful you are when studying and working on assignments. The internal environment of your brain plays a vital role in learning; meaning that you can study all day and all night but if you don’t look after your brain, it will all be for nothing.

A healthy brain can lead to improved:

  • concentration
  • memory and retention
  • mental performance

 

What your brain needs to survive and thrive are often the exact same things you tend to neglect when preparing for exams or working flat out on a deadline.

1. FOOD

The brain is made up of:

  • fat
  • water
  • neurons – they process and transmit information

To fuel the learning functions of your neurons, you need to feed your brain:

  • good fats
  • protein
  • complex carbohydrates
  • micro-nutrients
  • water

By nourishing your brain with the correct food and adequate water, you are providing your neurons with a healthy environment in which to function. However, by feeding your brain the incorrect foods and dehydrating it you are in fact starving your neurons of the energy they need to function, grow and regenerate. The next time you feel foggy, tired or unable to concentrate take a moment to think about what you have (or haven’t) eaten in the past few hours…

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Good Fats:

Your brain is largely made up of fatty membranes, making up approximately 60% of solid brain matter. As such, fats provide your brain with energy, but we’re talking good fats here namely, Omega 3 and 6 oils which can be derived from:

  • Fatty fish, such as: sardines, tuna, pilchards and salmon
  • Nuts, such as: walnuts, brazil nuts, macadamia
  • Seeds, such as: sunflower seeds, flax seeds
  • Dark leafy greens, such as: spinach, kale, broccoli

Bad fats are literally like sludge in the brain’s circulatory system; they effect the flow of oxygen to the brain, as well as the flow of toxins and waste out of the brain.

Bad fats include:

  • Processed foods, such as: cakes, biscuits, crisps, processed meats (e.g. polony) and processed cheese (e.g. cheese slices)
  • Deep fried foods, such as: chicken (e.g. KFC), chips etc.

Protein:

Protein provides your brain with amino acids, the building block for neurons. Good proteins include:

  • Lean meat – baked not fried (e.g. pork and ostrich)
  • Fish – baked not fried (e.g. salmon, tuna, pilchards)
  • Yoghurt – plain, unsweetened and not flavoured
  • Nuts – raw not roasted or flavoured
  • Eggs – poached or boiled not fried

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Carbohydrates:

Carbohydrates (including sugar) are an energy source for your brain. However, excessive consumption of sugar results in bursts of energy, followed by slumps including fidgeting, headaches, lack of concentration and drowsiness. The key is to provide your brain with the right type of carbohydrates i.e. good / complex carbohydrates, such as:

  • Brown rice
  • Wholewheat bread
  • Wholewheat pasta
  • Oats

You should avoid consuming bad / simple carbohydrates, such as:

  • Refined sugar (white sugar)
  • White bread
  • White pasta
  • White rice

Micro-nutrients:

Micro-nutrients are required in small amounts but are essential to a healthy brain; they include:

  • Vitamin B – for focus and concentration
  • Zinc – for the formation of memories
  • Calcium – to help cleanse the brain of toxins and waste

Micro-nutrients can be found in:

  • Fresh fruit and vegetables
  • Seeds
  • Nuts
  • Plain milk
  • Plain yoghurt

You should avoid consuming anything that includes artificial flavourants or colouring.

Water:

Dehydration results in:

  • Reduced cognitive abilities
  • Poor concentration
  • Fatigue
  • Dizziness
  • and may even damage your brain

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2. SLEEP

We spend a 1/3 of our lives sleeping, it is crucial to our health and mental well being. During sleep your brain is nearly as active as it is when you are awake – from the day you are born to the day you die, your brain is active and working. So what is it so busy doing?

During sleep the brain processes complex stimuli and information is has received during the waking hours; it uses this information to make decisions when you are awake.

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While you are sleeping your brain forms and saves new memories and incorporates them with old memories, this is why sleep is so important for learning. By sleeping before you study, you are helping the brain prepare for the intake of new information. By sleeping after you have studied, you are helping the brain save the new information. If you deprive your brain of sleep, your ability to learn new information drops by 40%.

Sleep is also known to boost creativity – the mind in its unconscious, “resting” state makes new connections that it may not be able to make during its waking state.

Sleep gives the brain a chance to do housekeeping – while you are asleep the brain flushes out toxins that build up when you are awake. It also allows the brain to convert short-term memories into long term memories .

Until you reach your early to mid-20s you need approximately 9 hours of sleep per night in order to function optimally the next day. A tired person’s brain works harder and accomplishes less thus adding to the argument that “pulling an all-nighter” is in fact a waste of time and sleep.

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3. EXERCISE

Physical activity boosts blood and oxygen flow through the brain resulting in your neurons being stimulated and thus able to connect with one another better. Exercise is like fertilizer for the brain, in that improved blood and oxygen flow results in improved:

  • Attention
  • Memory
  • Accuracy
  • Information processing
  • LEARNINGdownload

In addition to this, exercise improves your mood and quality of sleep; it also reduces stress and anxiety – all problems that cause or contribute to learning and concentration problems.

Aim for approximately one hour of moderate intensity exercise twice per week, for example: brisk walking or swimming

 

So, what’s the moral of the story?

Eat right. Get enough sleep. Get some exercise.

Look after your brain.

homer


References:

Mastin, L. (2013). Why do we sleep? Memory Processing and Learning. Retrieved from: http://www.howsleepworks.com/why_memory.html . [Accessed: 22 September 2015].

Norman, P. (2014). Feeding the Brain for Academic Success: How Nutrition and Hydration Boost Learning. Retrieved from: http://teacherweb.com/NY/NorthRose-WolcottMiddleSchool/HealthEducation/Academics-and-Nutrition-Article-Assignment.doc . [Accessed: 22 September 2015].

Appeals Close TODAY – Summative Assessments: Semester B (2016)

ATTENTION:

ALL BOSTON MEDIA HOUSE STUDENTS

announcement-704x268_2

SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT APPEALS for Semester B (2016) CLOSE TODAYThursday, 15 December 2016 at 17:00.

 

Students who are unable to receive their Final Report for 2016 because of tuition account arrears WILL NOT be able to submit an appeal for a Summative Assessment (Semester B – 2016) after TODAY Thursday, 15 December 2016.

Appeals Closing Date – Summative Assessments: Semester B (2016)

ATTENTION:

ALL BOSTON MEDIA HOUSE STUDENTS

announcement-704x268_2

SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT APPEALS for Semester B (2016) close on Thursday, 15 December 2016.

 

Students who are unable to receive their Final Report for 2016 because of tuition account arrears WILL NOT be able to submit an appeal for a Summative Assessment (Semester B – 2016) AFTER Thursday, 15 December 2016.

Summative Assessment 1: Semester A (2016) – Appeals Close TODAY

ATTENTION:

ALL BOSTON MEDIA HOUSE STUDENTS

announcement-704x268_2

Summative Assessment Appeals for Semester A (2016) close TODAY Friday, 08 July 2016.

 

Students who are unable to receive their Progress Report because of tuition account arrears will not be able to submit an appeal for a Summative Assessment (Semester A – 2016) after TODAY Friday, 08 July 2016.

Summative Assessment 1: Semester A (2016) – Appeals Closing Date

ATTENTION:

ALL BOSTON MEDIA HOUSE STUDENTS

announcement-704x268_2

Summative Assessment Appeals for Semester A (2016) close on Friday, 08 July 2016.

 

Students who are unable to receive their Progress Report because of tuition account arrears will not be able to submit an appeal for a Summative Assessment (Semester A – 2016) after Friday, 08 July 2016.