Tag Archives: class attendance

Assessment Due Dates

With due dates either already past or looming, it’s time to look at the importance of meeting submission deadlines. 

tumblr_mqr9fkBrdz1s4baulo1_500

Without fail the three most common reasons for students losing valuable marks in assessments are:

  • handing in assessments late
  • not reading or following the assessment brief
  • poor referencing 

By ignoring just one of these simple, standard requirements you are guaranteeing yourself a loss of at the very least 20% of your total mark. There are very few, if any, students who can afford to take such a knock when it comes to their grades.

PicMonkey Collage

ASSESSMENT DUE DATES

One of the quickest ways you can kiss between 20% and 100% of your mark good-bye is by handing in an assessment late.

What Does the Student Rulebook Say?

Section 5.8.v – Late Submissions:

Students must hand in or submit projects / assignments during their allocated class time; in the required format specified by the lecturer.

Penalties for late submissions are applied as follows – if a student submits his / her assignment:

  • immediately after the allocated deadline = minus 20%
  • one day late = minus 50%
  • two days late or more = 0%

These penalties are applied across all subjects and are not negotiable. If a student is absent on the date that the assignment is due, a valid medical certificate covering illness during the day of hand-in or the day/s directly after is required in order for the student not be penalised. If a valid and legitimate medical certificate is not presented and affixed to the project / assignment the penalties apply. 

No documentation from a medical institution without an official diagnosis signed by the doctor will be accepted. In other words, a letter simply stating that a student visited the clinic is not a valid medical certificate. In any other situation, valid official documentation is required.

No telephonic conversation will be entered into, nor will an e-mail be accepted. 

What’s Your Excuse?

Believe me when I tell you, your lecturer has heard it all before but for argument’s sake let’s take a look at the most common excuses for handing in an assessment late:

I needed more time

If this is your “go to” excuse then you may need to reassess your time management skills. You can find tips and strategies to help you better manage your time here.

If time management isn’t the issue then perhaps a lack of class attendance may be the reason for you running short of time on assessments; the BMH Student Rulebook (2017, p. 26) clearly states that:

Students will be informed in class of assessment briefs and dates at least two weeks in advance…It is the student’s responsibility to ensure that they are fully informed of all assessments prior to the actual assessment date.

If you are not attending classes regularly, you are at risk of receiving assessment briefs late, or even worse, not at all.

I need extra time because *insert credible reason here*

If for some or other legitimate reason you are unable to submit your assessment on the specified due date you may apply for an extension. However be very sure to read the rules for this special application carefully:

Section 5.8.iv – Applying for an Extension:

Students requesting an extension on an assignment due date are required to do so in writing at least ten (10) working days before the due date, by completing an Extension Request Form available from the Student Information Desk / Centre; after which it will be submitted to the relevant Academic Manager and lecturer. If the request is granted, the Extension Request Form will be signed off by the relevant lecturer and Academic Manager and will be placed in the student’s record file. The student will be notified telephonically (sms) and / or in writing, whether an extension has been granted or not. 

My USB broke / isn’t working

Always save your assessment to a spare / back up USB or drive. Technology fails all the time and this won’t be accepted as an excuse for submitting an assessment late.

The printer broke / ran out of ink / paper OR The queue  for the printer in the library was long.

Don’t leave the printing of your assessment to the last minute meaning you have no time to arrange a back up plan or find an alternative printer. Technology fails all the time and this won’t be accepted as an excuse for submitting an assessment late.

My taxi / bus / lift was running late.

On the day of an assessment due date ensure that you arrive well in advance of the hand-in time. Transportation issues will not be accepted as an excuse for submitting an assessment late. 

download (1)


Reference:

Boston Media House. (2017). Student Rulebook, 2017. Johannesburg, South Africa.

 

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Assessment Due Dates

With due dates either already past or looming, it’s time to look at the importance of meeting submission deadlines. 

tumblr_mqr9fkBrdz1s4baulo1_500

Without fail the three most common reasons for students losing valuable marks in assessments are:

  • handing in assessments late
  • not reading or following the assessment brief
  • poor referencing 

By ignoring just one of these simple, standard requirements you are guaranteeing yourself a loss of at the very least 20% of your total mark. There are very few, if any, students who can afford to take such a knock when it comes to their grades.

PicMonkey Collage

ASSESSMENT DUE DATES

One of the quickest ways you can kiss between 20% and 100% of your mark good-bye is by handing in an assessment late.

What Does the Student Rulebook Say?

Section 5.8.v – Late Submissions:

Students must hand in or submit projects / assignments during their allocated class time; in the required format specified by the lecturer.

Penalties for late submissions are applied as follows – if a student submits his / her assignment:

  • immediately after the allocated deadline = minus 20%
  • one day late = minus 50%
  • two days late or more = 0%

These penalties are applied across all subjects and are not negotiable. If a student is absent on the date that the assignment is due, a valid medical certificate covering illness during the day of hand-in or the day/s directly after is required in order for the student not be penalised. If a valid and legitimate medical certificate is not presented and affixed to the project / assignment the penalties apply. 

No documentation from a medical institution without an official diagnosis signed by the doctor will be accepted. In other words, a letter simply stating that a student visited the clinic is not a valid medical certificate. In any other situation, valid official documentation is required.

No telephonic conversation will be entered into, nor will an e-mail be accepted. 

What’s Your Excuse?

Believe me when I tell you, your lecturer has heard it all before but for argument’s sake let’s take a look at the most common excuses for handing in an assessment late:

I needed more time

If this is your “go to” excuse then you may need to reassess your time management skills. You can find tips and strategies to help you better manage your time here.

If time management isn’t the issue then perhaps a lack of class attendance may be the reason for you running short of time on assessments; the BMH Student Rulebook (2017, p. 26) clearly states that:

Students will be informed in class of assessment briefs and dates at least two weeks in advance…It is the student’s responsibility to ensure that they are fully informed of all assessments prior to the actual assessment date.

If you are not attending classes regularly, you are at risk of receiving assessment briefs late, or even worse, not at all.

I need extra time because *insert credible reason here*

If for some or other legitimate reason you are unable to submit your assessment on the specified due date you may apply for an extension. However be very sure to read the rules for this special application carefully:

Section 5.8.iv – Applying for an Extension:

Students requesting an extension on an assignment due date are required to do so in writing at least ten (10) working days before the due date, by completing an Extension Request Form available from the Student Information Desk / Centre; after which it will be submitted to the relevant Academic Manager and lecturer. If the request is granted, the Extension Request Form will be signed off by the relevant lecturer and Academic Manager and will be placed in the student’s record file. The student will be notified telephonically (sms) and / or in writing, whether an extension has been granted or not. 

My USB broke / isn’t working

Always save your assessment to a spare / back up USB or drive. Technology fails all the time and this won’t be accepted as an excuse for submitting an assessment late.

The printer broke / ran out of ink / paper OR The queue  for the printer in the library was long.

Don’t leave the printing of your assessment to the last minute meaning you have no time to arrange a back up plan or find an alternative printer. Technology fails all the time and this won’t be accepted as an excuse for submitting an assessment late.

My taxi / bus / lift was running late.

On the day of an assessment due date ensure that you arrive well in advance of the hand-in time. Transportation issues will not be accepted as an excuse for submitting an assessment late. 

download (1)


Reference:

Boston Media House. (2017). Student Rulebook, 2017. Johannesburg, South Africa.

 

Why Attend Lectures?

BMH, Durban lecturer, Julia Sutherland, has provided us with eight excellent reasons why you should attend lectures.

2509265803_fd5fe56b33It’s a new year and a good time to work on kicking bad habits and introducing new ones. For many students the temptation to skip lectures is huge and can end up snowballing into an irreversible problem after too many have been missed.

Think of it this way: if lectures weren’t necessary, they wouldn’t be offered. Need more convincing? Here are another eight good reasons why you should be attending lectures:

  1. Someone is paying a lot of money for you to be here, whether you are paying for yourself, or if your parents are paying for you, or even if you are on a bursary; someone is making sacrifices for your education. If you don’t attend class, you are throwing away money. Jonas (2006) advises students to “make the most of [their] investment by attending class.”
  2. If you miss a class, you will always miss something, even if you get notes from a friend.
  3. Lectures are where the assessment answers are, how else are you going to get them? You will also find out what you don’t have to study from the textbook, which will save you time later.
  4. I know a lot of us are commitment-phobes, but as an adult it is important to show commitment to something. If you sign up for a course you are promising to be there for every lecture – this is how resources (such as lecture room size) are allocated.
  5. Did you know that according to a study done at Harvard University (2010) only 6.7% of the world have a college education? So many people would give anything to be in your shoes, so don’t squander the opportunity.
  6. Many studies (Aden, Yahye & Dahir, 2013; Narula & Nagar, 2013; Cheung, 2009; LeBlan, 2005) have shown that class attendance and student success rates are positively correlated. In other words, students who attend lectures are more likely to succeed.
  7. Generally if you attend class (and focus while you are there), the time you will need later to study is decreased.
  8. Finally, your lecturers spend so much time and effort on creating class material that is educational, interesting and most importantly contains information that you need to pass (or rather ace) the course. It is the job of a lecturer to help those who want to learn, so make sure you fall into that category and you will get all the help that you need.

lectures


References:

LeBlanc, H.P. (2005) The Relationship Between Attendance and Grades in the College Classroom. Proceedings from the 17th annual Meeting of the International Academy of Business Disciplines. Pittsburgh

Cheung, J.C.K. (2009) Class Attendance and Performance, Which Comes First? Proceedings from the 20th Australasian Association for Engineering Education Conference. University of Adelaide

Narula, M., Nagar, P. (2013) Relationship Between Students’ Performance and Class Attendance in a Programming Language Subject in a Computer Course. International Journal of Computer Science and Mobile Computing. Vol. 2, Issue 8. Pg. 206 – 210

Aden, A.A., Yahye, Z.A., Dahir, A.M. (2013) The Effect of Students’ Attendance on Academic Performance: A Case Study at Simad University Mogadishu. Academic Research International. Vol. 4, Issue 6. Pg. 409 – 417

Jonas, C. (2006) 6 Great Reasons to Go to Class. Accessed from <http://collegelifesite.com/6_Great_Reasons_To_Go_To_Class.htm&gt; Access Date [17/08/2015]

Huffington Post (2015) 6.7% of the World Has College Degree. Accessed from <http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/05/19/percent-of-world-with-col_n_581807.html&gt; Access Date [17/08/2015]