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Take a Break

With Summative Assessment season upon us, it’s important to remember to  keep things balanced and to take regular breaks.

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It may sound counter-intuitive when you have submission dates piling up and exams to study for, but studies show that when we work / study for hours on end on the same task, with no breaks, our brain slowly starts to switch off  and no longer registers what we are doing. Taking regular breaks from studying, or working on an assignment, allows your mind to refocus and improves attention. The trick however, lies in selecting the correct type of activity for your study / work break so that you return to your task focused and refreshed.

How Long Should You Be Studying / Working For?

The general consensus appears to be:

  • Study / work for 50 – 90 minutes with a 10 minute break in between sessions.

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  • And to take a slightly longer break after every 2 to 3 sessions.

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“Good” Study / Work Breaks

Different activities work for different people. The point is to decide on an activity that will help refresh you and that makes the transition back to work / studying easy.  Also, a “good” break is one that isn’t able to morph into a procrastination tactic.

The simplest way to manage your breaks (and even your study / work sessions) is by setting a timer – when the timer goes, the break is over.

Good, reinvigorating breaks include:

  • Moving away from the screen / book / desk – sitting in the same position for hours on end is no good for you, especially if you are hunched up with tension and anxious about what you are working on. Get up and stretch, move around, get your blood flowing and your eyes moving and focusing on different things. Even better, go for a 10 minute walk outside – the fresh air will help clear your mind and re-energize you for your next session.
  • Chitter-chatter – you’ve been “in the zone” for the past 50 – 90 minutes, phone a friend or find someone to have a quick (emphasis on “quick“) chat with. It will help you change your focus and feel connected again.
  • Dance, draw, doodle – do something creative and fun for 10 minutes. Dancing can boost your energy and lift your mood. Colouring in (yes, with crayons or pencils) is a wonderfully relaxing way to clear your mind and get your focus back.
  • Eat – whether it’s a quick snack (during your 10 minute break) or a light lunch (during your 30 minute break), the low efficiency activity of putting together a light and healthy snack or meal not only allows your mind to focus on something else, but refuels your body and improves your mindset.

What Not to Do

Just like the right type of break can energize you, the wrong type of break can result in unplanned detours and distractions that make it hard to get back to work and full focus.

Things to avoid include:

  • TV / Computer Games / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram / Snapchat / WhatsApp / E-mail – Rule of thumb: if it has a screen, avoid it. None of these activities boost productivity or focus; what they do is leave you feeling more tired, wound up and distracted than before. Unless you are done studying or working for the day, or self-discipline is your secret super power, don’t use any of these as your downtime break activity.
  • Catch some Zzzzz’s – Taking a nap can actually be counter-productive to your work / study schedule; more often than not it leaves you feeling more tired and less inclined to want to get back to work. Instead, aim for a solid 8 – 9 hours uninterrupted sleep a night and if you absolutely have to take a nap during the day, ensure that it is not longer than 20 minutes.
  • Quick fix – A take-away pizza (junk food) and super sized energy drink (caffeine) may make for a quick meal break and energy boost, but that is exactly what they are…quick. Neither offer sustained energy or benefit, instead resulting in your blood sugar spiking and then crashing, leaving you feeling flat and tired.

References:

How to Take a Study Break. (2015).  Retrieved from: https://www.brainscape.com/blog/2011/06/study-break/ [Accessed on: 14 October 2016].

Hoyt, E. (2016). Energizing Study Break Ideas & What to Avoid. Retrieved from: http://www.fastweb.com/student-life/articles/energizing-study-break-ideas-what-to-avoid [Accessed on: 14 October 2016].

Nauert, R. (2011). Taking Breaks Found to Improve Attention. Retrieved from: https://psychcentral.com/news/2011/02/09/taking-breaks-found-to-improve-attention/23329.html [Accessed on: 14 October 2016].

You’ve Been Taking Breaks All Wrong. Here’s How To Do It Right. (2013). Retrieved from: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/12/19/youve-been-taking-breaks-_n_4453448.html [Accessed on: 14 October 2016].

 

The Difference Between High School and College

The transition from high school to college can come as a bit of a shock to some. Here are a few of the main differences you will experience – bearing in mind that: forewarned is forearmed.

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Important points to take note of:

  • Learn to manage your time. Plan ahead and make your studies a priority, making space for everything else.
  • Do not assume that because you did well in high school that you will automatically do well at college. The level of cognitive and critical engagement, marking criteria and other factors require different levels of synthesis and understanding.
  • Be patient with yourself. You are entering a new phase in your life and a different learning environment, a transition which takes time to adjust to.
  • Remember to look after your health both mentally and physically. Good nutrition, regular exercise and a balanced study schedule are all basic requirements for success at college and in life.
  • Read your Course Outlines and Student Rules and Regulations Booklet. Your lecturers and Boston support staff will assume you have done so and that you are familiar with Boston’s policies and procedures.
  • Attending college is not like attending school or having a job – your hours are not set and you will need to be flexible in terms of your study patterns.
  • You need to be proactive, be it in terms of making friends or approaching a lecturer for assistance.

References:

From Secondary School to University. (2015). Retrieved from:  http://www.deakin.edu.au/students/study-support/new-students/secondary-school  [Accessed on: 08 February 2016].

How is College Different from High School. (n.d.). Retrieved from: http://www.smu.edu/Provost/ALEC/NeatStuffforNewStudents/HowIsCollegeDifferentfromHighSchool  [Accessed on: 08 February 2016].

School to Uni: What’s the Difference? (2014). Retrieved from:  https://www.adelaide.edu.au/writingcentre/learning_guides/learningGuide_schoolToUniWhatsTheDifference.pdf  [Accessed on: 08 February 2016].