Marijuana: How to Stop Using

Giving up marijuana can be difficult, particularly for the chronic, daily user. In order to successfully stop using, you will need to educate yourself so that you’ll know what to expect and be prepared to deal with any issues should they arise.

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The Decision to Stop Using:

Without being personally motivated, the chances of you being able to successfully stop using marijuana are low. The decision to stop using has to be yours…not your partners or your parents.

Withdrawal symptoms are experienced when a person stops habitually using a drug – they occur because the person has developed a physical dependency on the drug. Daily use of marijuana can lead to physical dependency and as such marijuana users will experience withdrawal symptoms when they either stop or reduce their marijuana intake.

How Long?:

The time it will take to fully withdraw from marijuana is dependent on the individual and their history of use. The longer you’ve been using, the longer it will take to withdraw.

Following your last use of marijuana, you can expect to start experiencing withdrawal symptoms within a 1 – 3 days and they can last for anything from a week to a month.

Is it safe?:

Unlike other drugs, marijuana does not typically have any dangerous withdrawal symptoms – that is not to say that it is going to be easy and without discomfort. Withdrawal does not necessarily require any specialised treatment but it may be helpful to have the guidance of an addiction specialist so as to minimize the chances of relapse and equip you to cope with the withdrawal symptoms.

Withdrawal Symptoms:

You will most likely experience a number of different withdrawal symptoms when you stop using marijuana. The most common symptoms include:

  • headaches
  • drug cravings
  • anxiety
  • decreased appetite
  • irritability
  • insomnia
  • restlessness
  • nausea

Easing Withdrawal Symptoms:

Most of the withdrawal symptoms related to the withdrawal from marijuana use can be treated at home with every day, over-the-counter medication as well as a few changes in routine and habits.

  • Headaches can be treated with use of standard pain or headache medication
  • Nausea can be treated with over-the-counter stomach medication
  • Anxiety, restlessness, irritability and insomnia can be addressed by: decreasing your caffeine intake, increasing or starting a regular exercise routine and, learning basic breathing and relaxation exercises

Best Practice:

There is no “best way” to withdraw from marijuana. Past users do however advise that it is easier to gradually wean yourself off using the drug by reducing the amount used each day over a period of a couple of weeks. This method is often more successful than going “cold turkey” and stopping all use at once.

Those who are trying to quit are also advised to get rid of all of their marijuana and accompanying paraphernalia once they have decided to quit – this includes pipes, bongs etc; to surround themselves with non-users and; to try keep busy and active, this will help with cravings and temptation.

Although safety is not usually an issue when withdrawing from marijuana use, it is helpful to under go withdrawal with some form of addiction or medical support as this will decrease the chances of relapse and you will have the help you need should something go wrong.

Exposure to marijuana has physical, biological, mental, behavioural and social consequences. The decision whether or not to use marijuana will always be a personal one. 

Please refer to the Policies page of this blog for BMH’s Student Policy on the Possession, Use and Distribution of Illicit Substances (including marijuana).


Adapted from:

Motivation to stop smoking weed – Addictionblog.org and How to withdraw from marijuana – Addictionblog.org

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